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theatlantic:

Did the EPA Just Kill Big Coal?

Today, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed a set of landmark greenhouse gas regulations that will surely have every coal country politician, from the hills to Appalachia to the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, sputtering mad. The rule will require new power plants to emit about 43 percent less carbon dioxide than today’s coal-fired generators. Natural gas plants already meet this requirement. But if a utility wants to burn coal for electricity, it will need to install carbon capture technology — and that’s really expensive.
“This standard effectively bans new coal plants,” one petulant lobbyist told The Washington Post. 
And indeed, it could. But while that might be devastating for mining companies, it won’t mean a whole lot to consumers. Coal use, you see, is already in decline. Blame America’s natural gas boom. 
In December, coal generated less than 40 percent of America’s electricity for the first time since March 1978, according to the Energy Information Administration. Even before the proposed greenhouse gas rules, Deutsch Bank predicted it would be producing as little as 20 percent by 2030. And Exxon Mobil forecasts that natural gas will replace coal as the U.S. top fuel for electricity by 2025. 
Read more. [Image: U.S. Energy Information Administration]



Looks like Mother Earth may get a victory!

theatlantic:

Did the EPA Just Kill Big Coal?

Today, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed a set of landmark greenhouse gas regulations that will surely have every coal country politician, from the hills to Appalachia to the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, sputtering mad. The rule will require new power plants to emit about 43 percent less carbon dioxide than today’s coal-fired generators. Natural gas plants already meet this requirement. But if a utility wants to burn coal for electricity, it will need to install carbon capture technology — and that’s really expensive.

“This standard effectively bans new coal plants,” one petulant lobbyist told The Washington Post

And indeed, it could. But while that might be devastating for mining companies, it won’t mean a whole lot to consumers. Coal use, you see, is already in decline. Blame America’s natural gas boom. 

In December, coal generated less than 40 percent of America’s electricity for the first time since March 1978, according to the Energy Information Administration. Even before the proposed greenhouse gas rules, Deutsch Bank predicted it would be producing as little as 20 percent by 2030. And Exxon Mobil forecasts that natural gas will replace coal as the U.S. top fuel for electricity by 2025. 

Read more. [Image: U.S. Energy Information Administration]

Looks like Mother Earth may get a victory!

(via emergentfutures)

  1. moonhowler56 reblogged this from emergentfutures
  2. meggsie reblogged this from emergentfutures and added:
    Looks like Mother Earth may get a victory!
  3. emergentfutures reblogged this from climateadaptation
  4. biodegradablepsychology reblogged this from theatlantic
  5. coalashchronicles reblogged this from theatlantic
  6. alphabet-town reblogged this from theatlantic and added:
    quit coal. quit natural gas too, for that matter, but one step at a time.
  7. readinglist32 reblogged this from firthofforth
  8. sanctuarial reblogged this from theatlantic
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  12. quantum-immortal reblogged this from reagan-was-a-horrible-president and added:
    Thank god :D
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  17. sosungjackskellington reblogged this from climateadaptation and added:
    yes.
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